This topic contains 12 replies, has 10 voices, and was last updated by  kal 3 months ago.

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  • #4260

    benny
    Participant

    I have been thinking about getting some computer glasses for when I am working on the computer. I don’t have bad vision but I have a glass screen monitor that has terrible glare, this is a real pain when coding. Not only does it give me eye strain but it is really distracting seeing my ugly mug staring back at me when I am working etc.

    Has any one used computer glasses before??? Will they protect my eyes and stop glare from my screen reflected everything back at me? Hoping they also have the added benefit of stopping wrinkles under the eye because I will no longer be squinting.
    Would be really grateful for replies as I don’t want to waste my money on a pair of it is just a fad that doesn’t even work.

    Cheers!

  • #4261

    jam
    Participant

    Go to an optician – if you are straining your eyes you probably need some minor adjustment for screen work. (which should be paid for by your employer)

    Only polarised glasses will make a difference to reflections off your screen.

  • #4262

    katy
    Participant

    Buy an anti-glare screen filter or close the window blind?

  • #4263

    jamie
    Participant

    Has any one used computer glasses before???

    Yes, but not for glare. I just find that I’m now slightly too long-sighted to comfortably read text on screen wearing my normal glasses, and slightly too short-sighted to manage comfortably without. I have a pair of half-strength glasses for working and it has made a huge difference.

    I had started to get odd visual migraines (including developing a disturbing blind spot that was particularly inconvenient when driving…) but these have stopped pretty much completely since I’ve had my ‘computer glasses. Which is nice because I was starting to worry I might have a brain tumour.

  • #4264

    benny
    Participant

    Thanks for your replies guys much appreciated!

    Had a look at some different anti glare screen filters to put over the top of the screen.. and for something that is essentially just essentially a plastic sheet they are very expensive.
    I wonder if just a pair of cheap pair of polarized sunglasses from ebay or somewhere would do the trick rather than spending a lot of money as im tight on cash at the minute (self employed)?

  • #4265

    Luke
    Participant

    Drape a white bed sheet over your window so as to reduce the harsh light, move your computer screen, sellotape white paper over the window? If its just to get by before you can earn some money then anything home made will be better than spending money.

  • #4266

    kevster
    Participant

    I’m a sceptical of special lens coatings that are supposed to reduce glare from computer screens by filtering out a proportion of blue-violet light. There isn’t any good quality evidence that such a filter reduces symptoms (headaches, strained/tired-feeling eyes) associated with prolonged use of screens. That said, some people think they’re great.

    If you go for an eye test and describe your symptoms, your optom may prescribe something that may help. You might be long-sighted or presbyopic (depending on your age), or you could have a binocular vision problem that’s causing the trouble.(the muscles that co-ordinate the two eyes might be a bit out of whack). They might also prescribe something that doesn’t help, depending on how good they are (it’s easier to prescribe specs with a ‘might help’ prescription, such as +0.50 R+L for someone who doesn’t need glasses at all, than to accurately diagnose and manage a subtle binocular vision problem…an optom who’s under loads of pressure to be quick and makes lots of sales is fairly likely to do this, so beware. But again, this type of prescription does really help some people, every case is different).

    I wonder if just a pair of cheap pair of polarized sunglasses from ebay or somewhere would do the trick rather than spending a lot of money as im tight on cash at the minute (self employed)?

    This is, in the nicest possible way, a crap idea. Polarised sunglasses are quite dark. And since the light coming from your monitor is polarised, depending on the direction of polarisation you might not be able to see anything on your screen at all! If you’re getting symptoms from prolonged screen use, it could be down to all sorts of things, none of which are helped by wearing polarised sunglasses. But an eye test is by far the best way to find out more.

    EDIT: Do you work on an old CRT monitor? The light from that isn’t polarised, so, yeah, you might find that polarised sunglasses will cut out reflections depending on what angle they’re coming at you from. But it will be weird wearing sunglasses indoors!

    • This reply was modified 3 months, 2 weeks ago by  kevster.
  • #4268

    ted
    Participant

    I’m a sceptical of special lens coatings that are supposed to reduce glare from computer screens by filtering out a proportion of blue-violet light. There isn’t any good quality evidence that such a filter reduces symptoms (headaches, strained/tired-feeling eyes) associated with prolonged use of screens. That said, some people think they’re great.

    @kevster Several pairs of glasses ago, maybe 6 years ago, I went to a popular cheap high street optician (sorry! but that’s another discussion – FTR I am happy with them) for an eye test and also to treat myself to new glasses. They had, of course, their everlong DFS-style “two pairs for £x” and I went for this, and decided to do a placebo test on myself. I got the anti-glare coating (£30) put on one pair and not the other, and deliberately at POS chose them so randomly that by the time I’d got home, I’d already genuinely forgotten which pair had the anti-glare. And certainly by the time the new glasses reached me, I’d totally forgotten.

    In 2-3 years of use, I never noticed that one of the two pairs was giving me any more problems than the other, regarding glare and reflection.

  • #4269

    oldguy
    Participant

    What are “computer glasses”?
    Are they just cheap non-prescribed glasses a bit like “readers” that have been around for decades, but marketed as being for computer/VDU use? What is the selling point?

  • #4270

    kevster
    Participant

    @ted The type of coating you’re talking about causes more light to go through the lens than be reflected off it. They’re sold as “anti-glare” but that’s not a very good description of what the coating does. The most useful thing it does IMO is cosmetic: someone else looking at you sees your eyes through the lens, not reflections. When I seen someone on telly wearing glasses without this type of coating I think, “didn’t anyone tell you how shit those glasses would look on telly?!” They’ll also make sure that you (the wearer) can’t see a reflection of your own eye (or any light source behind you) in the lens.

    It doesn’t surprise me that you can’t tell the difference between your anti-reflection coated specs and non-coated ones, but I’d tell the difference in how they look on your face in an instant.

    The type of coatings that are supposed to cut out glare from computer screens specifically (blue filter) are something a bit different. You can tell when you look through them because they make everything a bit yellow.

    @oldguy Computer glasses could mean many different things. People might commonly use a lens to get the computer screen in focus (this would only be different from general use glasses for someone of about 50 or older), or a lens with no focusing power that’s meant to do something else apparently helpful (e.g. blue filter). Other possibilities exist.

  • #4271

    mo
    Participant

    Have you tried tilting the bottom of the screen away from you? (Most screens can adjust a bit like this).

  • #4272

    benny
    Participant

    Thanks for all the detailed replies!

    The monitor im currently using is a LCD with a fixed glass panel over the top of it. Even on really dull days like today using programs with mostly black backgrounds the glare is a total nightmare and looks like a mirror. Whilst working with programs with a mostly white background I do not get glare but the brightness is quite strong and causes eye strain. I tried a program called f.lux to try to try to fix the glare and eye strain, whilst it did help somewhat with the brightness problems it didn’t help at all with the glare. A side effect to this program is that it makes everything look yellow and makes your eyes tired.

    I think I will avoid computer glasses bought from random places online then.. one brand I looked at called gunnar was criticized in an article I found for making up science jargon and technology to sell their computer glasses.

  • #4444

    kal
    Participant

    If the problem is just glare then surely a monitor with a matt screen will be the answer.

    For eye problems, instead of reading glasses, I measured the distance from pupil to screen and got the optician to set the lenses to this focal length, which was a bit more than for reading.

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