This topic contains 8 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  queenbee 2 months ago.

  • Author
    Posts
  • #4648

    jessy
    Participant

    Any nurses out there please? Warning, yucky descriptions…..

    Because yes I have tried to make an appointment to see one at my local surgery, but they can only offer me lunchtime tomorrow which is totally impractical! Otherwise no other appointments free all week….

    So, the bruising on my arm also has a deeply grazed bit in the middle – originally it looked like quite a hole, which I thought might need a stitch or some steri strips, but because of the way my arm has swelled it looks like a flat wound now. All good with that, but it is constantly oozing with clear fluid which is a real pain – I have to change the dressing a couple of times a day because a bubble of fluid forms under the dressing and begins to leak.

    So my question really is, should I be covering that area OR should I be exposing it to the air in the hope it dries out? Or is it likely to be a very small haematoma because of all the bruising underneath, which I absolutely hate because the d***n things seep for weeks and weeks in my experience

    Sorry, told you it was yucky! Any advice would be very helpful, or I can resort to just ringing NHS direct?

  • #4649

    lucy
    Participant

    I wouldn’t expose it to the air because it will get infected and that would be way worse pain, and would scar as well.

    The clear fluid is plasma and is part of the natural healing process. It is exudate and is a fluid produced as part of the normal wound-healing process, and is essentially blood from which the platelets and red cells have been filtered out . It leaks from capillaries in the tissues surrounding a wound as a consequence of increased capillary permeability.

    It has been demonstrated that a covered wound heals faster than an uncovered wound! This is because the scab, although it closes off the wound and protects it from infection, actually impedes the growth of new skin cells in to cover the wound.

    • #4650

      jessy
      Participant

      Hmmmm, I do hear what you are saying, but I have left it uncovered since 3pm and it has dried out nicely, it is so much easier like that The arm is a revolting grey colour all around, yuck!!!

      I actually don’t care if it does scar, I have plenty already and I am too old to be bothered…..oh dear, what a dilemma now :/

  • #4651

    cam
    Participant

    It needs to be covered but with the right dressing which is hard to advise without seeing the wound. Ideally you want to be changing the dressing as infrequently as possible, as every dressing change, the wound cools from optimum healing temperature. A pharmacist may be able to take a look and suggest something you can buy over the counter.

    I’m an A&E nurse though, so a district nurse or someone better with dressings may come along.

    • #4652

      jessy
      Participant

      Thank you cam that is very much appreciated I have got some sterile dressings today so hopefully they will be OK – when I went to A&E they gave me massive dressings that looked like cling film! – but I will confess I have been changing the dressing daily (against the advice of the A&E consultant who saw me) as I find it so horrible to look at the bubble of blood always!

      I will behave myself, keep it covered, and avert my eyes if the dressing fills up again.

      • #4653

        cam
        Participant

        Honestly, don’t change it too often if it’s not showing signs of infection. Every time you change it, you will be removing the top layer of the wound healing process. Give it chance to make some progress.

  • #4654

    ratface
    Participant

    I changed dressings every 2-3 days. I didn’t put anything on any of the areas (major wound or where skin was taken for graft) until they were healed. My most important find was Allevyn gentle border for the hole or the petroleum infused dressings for the skin donation site, the latter didn’t stick and really helped.

    Try not to keep looking at it if you use dressings. Let it heal.

  • #4655

    sally
    Participant

    You could go to your local pharmacy for advise. The Scottish pharmacies deal with minor injuries and common issues.

  • #4656

    queenbee
    Participant

    Don’t rush it.

    (This is going to turn into a minor rant warning) My OH had fairly minor surgery on 19 January and has had to visit the doctors every day since to have the wound dressed. As he’s not driving, I have to take him and it’s playing havoc with life, work and the universe generally! As the GP surgery is not open at the weekend, we have to turn up at the local minor injuries unit and just wait, which is also playing havoc with day to day stuff etc, especially as both surgery and hospital are a more than ten-mile round trip. However, I have learned over the last four months that the “modern” approach to wound management is to keep dressing it until it’s completely healed. We had been getting reports that the nurses could see improvement but now he’s got to be referred back to a specialist.

    He has multiple health issues which would delay healing at the best of times but I have realised how slowly things heal from the inside out if that makes sense. In your case I’m sure it won’t be anywhere near that long but it makes sense to keep it covered for now to prevent complications further down the line – short-term PITA for long-term gain I reckon!

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.