This topic contains 7 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  sar 3 months, 4 weeks ago.

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  • #3374

    em
    Participant

    There are numerous signs all around London that there’s more than just fat bergs and trains under the pavements

    How Land Registry data reveals London’s secret tunnels

  • #3375

    Mick
    Participant

    Not just London. Manchester, Birmingham and several other large cities.

    Check out http://www.subbrit.org.uk/
    Lots more old, unused tunnels of all descriptions. Great for those who like exploring such places. (Just watch out for all that asbestos.)

    Also, if you fancy a bit of ‘urbex’, be aware that some may see it as ‘breaking and entering’. As some of the exchanges are in use and still classified, you could have all sorts of interesting legal problems.

  • #3376

    Ali
    Participant

    Not just London. Manchester, Birmingham and several other large cities.

    Including the rather awesome Williamson Tunnels under Liverpool:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Williamson_Tunnels

  • #3377

    Mick
    Participant

    @ali Manchester is full of holes.
    There is, apparently, over 100 miles of coal mines beneath the city. As well a a big old nuclear bunker stretching from just behind Umist up to Salford Uni.

  • #3378

    troll
    Participant

    Also, if you fancy a bit of ‘urbex’, be aware that some may see it as ‘breaking and entering’. As some of the exchanges are in use and still classified, you could have all sorts of interesting legal problems.

    @mick Wrong. The whole point of Urbex is the code of conduct, which means that you do not break and enter. Breaking open a premises to enter is certainly a criminal offence as is vandalism, which is Criminal Damage. Urbex means entering without damaging anything, which is not a crime. There may be a civil case if the landowner wanted to try to prove that you caused them financial loss by your actions but that’s a matter for the civil, not criminal courts. Trespassers cannot therefore be prosecuted.

  • #3379

    sar
    Participant

    I would urge anyone looking to do any underground exploration to invest in a gas detector.
    Not cheap at £350 plus vat for a BW 4 gas unit but it might save your life.
    There can be lots of rotted vegetation or human waste in tunnels and old sewers and walking through it can and will release poisonous and explosive gas.
    On the explosive side of things turning your phone off and investing £40 on an atex rated torch might save your life too.

  • #3380

    em
    Participant

    @sar Good advice. Years ago I used to have a job surveying sewers. Standard practice was to drop the meter down the manhole on a length of rope prior to entry.

    Very rare to see a toxic or explosive environment, but low oxygen was very common. Manholes, step irons and fixed ladders rust, and the oxgen needed in that process comes out of the air in the shaft and doesn’t get replaced.

    On a few occasions the oxygen level was so low as to have rendered you unconscious before you had a chance to get back out.

  • #3381

    sar
    Participant

    @em Toxic and explosive is rarer than low oxygen but I have seen it more times than I would like.
    Often things are fine until you disturb the old sludge in the bottom of the chamber leading to a release of Hydrogen Sulphide. The problem with that lovely gas is you only smell it for a second before your nasal receptors are burned out to it and I forget the numbers but it only takes something like 30ppm to kill you.
    Entry in to a confined space should always be preceded by a 5 minute dip test set to peek readings then a personal monitor should be carried at all times.

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