Adam

active 3 days, 7 hours ago
active 3 days, 7 hours ago
  • songbird posted a new activity comment 3 days, 7 hours ago

    @adam I suspect the difference in your experience to that of other posters is subject. Maths and physics simply are harder and require more work than modern languages or PPE, and that would be true at other universities as well.

    • I made a similar observation earlier and the awareness that the sciences required more hours of “compulsory” study did steer me away from Chemistry towards Languages. But science is not harder than the humanities. Once intractable maths and science problems are being solved all the time, yet a comprehensive understanding of the human condition (ph…[Read more]

      • You can argue that this is true for the subjects, but studying sciences is definitely harder than studying humanities, if only because understanding of a subject can be tested without ambiguity. You do not get far by providing your own “interpretation” of a maths or biology problem!

      • @songbird How does having a better definition of the correct answer make a subject harder? If anything that should single out the sciences as easier. Not that I’m making that argument since I’ve already observed that the sciences very obviously impose a greater compulsory workload.

        In literature or philosophy you are probing the mind of the aut…[Read more]

      • Being able to clearly distinguish correct and wrong answers in an exam leaves much less wiggle room for the student, no chance of getting by with some waffling and a good sales pitch! It is, therefore, possible to test a much larger body of knowledge in any given exam.

        I guess you will find that most science questions also do not simply ask for…[Read more]

      • “The regurgitating exams exist, but I would class them as simply lazy or even bad teaching practice!”

        I agree entirely. I don’t know about over in Germany (?) but here in the UK rote learning and regurgitation of formula keyed through Pavlovian training with certain question styles seems to the the main outcome of A-level sylibii and t…[Read more]

      • @ratface There’s also a lot of variation within the sciences. I started studying chemistry at university where there seemed to be usually be one single correct answer but for a variety of reasons dropped out of university for a while (ironically to get a job as a lab technician based on my chemistry skills). I later went back to study biology,…[Read more]

    • That may be true, but, by all accounts the Cambridge Maths course was (and probably still is) exceptionally demanding and fast paced. What’s more, you could be good enough to get in and then three years hard work later you could understand your stuff and still potentially be unable to do any questions in your finals – there were no questions just…[Read more]

    • > Maths and physics simply are harder and require more work than modern languages or PPE.

      Except for the truly brilliant few (and there were certainly some at Cambridge!) for whom the Maths course was apparently effortless. And unlike brilliant physicists, they didn’t have to do lab stuff and unlike brilliant humanities students, they didn’t…[Read more]

  • vallin posted a new activity comment 3 days, 7 hours ago

    @adam This observation is certainly true in many circumstances, like shortlisting cvs in some professions. But the favoritism would, at least in part, be recognized for the extra mile that many Oxbridge graduates are prepared to undergo to meet their objectives. A place at Oxbridge denotes a combination of objective setting and hard work that is…[Read more]

    • >This observation is certainly true in many circumstances, like shortlisting cvs in some professions. But the favoritism would, at least in part, be recognized for the extra mile that many Oxbridge graduates are prepared to undergo to meet their objectives. A place at Oxbridge denotes a combination of objective setting and hard work that is prized…[Read more]

      • Your description of the academic aspect certainly resonates with my recollection (and my daughter’s current travails at Cambridge). However, you present your “brilliant survivors” as the winners in the Oxbridge environment. My experience was of being surrounded by a thousand very able, very ambitious peers for whom the academic tasks were a tires…[Read more]

      • My problem was that I had to work really hard just to keep my head above water (lectures each morning then most of the rest of the day, often into the small hours, struggling desperately to understand my notes) and, far from aiming for a first, I ended up, after three years, more or less relying on some doable questions on seismic waves (!) to…[Read more]

  • @adam When written in a reasonable way (like you just have) yes it’s a sound idea to promote inclusivity. I just found the poster (and where it was situated) to be crass. It came across as callous and smacked of double speak.

  • nev replied to the topic Getting taxation right in the forum General Chat 6 months ago

    That’s happened in Sheffield, the bus which went up the hill near my home no longer runs, not so helpful as people age, or for older people already in the area. It only vanished once the buses were privatised.

    @adam It’s not just buses either, I only found out recently the coppers get a slice of pie from a new housing development.

    So it would…[Read more]

  • Matty replied to the topic Is there life after death? in the forum General Chat 6 months ago

    Let me chime in guys…

    @adam Even under classical assumptions you run into the problem of not having perfect knowledge of the initial states.

    If you actually try to do it, yes. But this is an experimental problem not a fundametal one. A big problem, for sure, but the fact remains a classical consciousness must fundamentally be computable by…[Read more]